13.11.12

Books by Theme: Reads to be Thankful For



This is a special Books by Theme.  It's November and for the Americans among us, that means Thanksgiving.  It may have a terrible, sad history, but let's focus on the good bit: it's a day to remind us that we have a lot to be thankful for.  So these are the books I'm thankful for.  They're books that got me through tough times.  Books that made a difference in my life. Books that got me where I am today.  


Reads to be Thankful For





Lichgates by S.M. Boyce
 I had a hell of a year last year, and I was in a pretty dark spot.  One of the reasons I started this blog was to help dig myself out of the hole.  I was a newbie, with no sense of the blogging world.  Just a dream and a silly title.  Then came S.M. Boyce inviting me to be a part of her blog tour.  Through her, I've met some of the greatest bloggers and writers out there and I've become part of a wonderful, supportive community.  And guess what?  Her book rocks.  It's YA fantasy come to life, with a super original world, realistic characters, and nonstop adventure.  I'll never forget the start it gave me.
Read my review



The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
This was with me for one whole summer.  It's a long book, the real version, and I read just a few pages a night before I went to sleep.  I feel like this book lived a huge part of my life with me, and it was an instant favorite.  Edmund Dantes is deep, relatable, and broken--the perfect anti-hero.  His story is filled with revenge and redemption, sorrow and triumph.  It's a reminder of what happens when one object consumes a man, and what he must give up to pursue it.  It's also just damn beautifully written, and it makes me want to write.



Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling
This won't be a long entry, because you already know how much this rocks (or you've already spurned it).  But Harry Potter was my childhood.  The movies ended the year I graduated college, the year I became a semi-official adult.  I feel like Harry and I grew up together, and I spent so much time in his world, making up my own characters on fanfic and roleplay sites.  Harry got me through an awkward childhood and kept the whimsy in my life.



I feel sad every time I finish these books, because I don't want them to end.  They're the purest, most whimsical, most breathtaking examples of childhood fantasy.  They remind me why I wanted to become a writer in the first place, and they make me feel like there's magic in the world even when it seems dark.



If you come around here a lot, you know that I love her.  I can't even pick just one.  My love of her started with The Chronicles of Chrestomanci Vol. 1, continued with Howl's Moving Castle, Dark Lord of Derkholm, and so many others.  Her books are fantasy incarnate.  They're original.  They're clever.  They're full of flawed people, plain-looking heroines who get the prince, downtrodden losers who find their inner magic, hope.  They've been there for me at every unsure moment.



The most perfect book ever written.  Wilde is my mentor, my idol, my inspiration.  I've knelt at his grave and read his works and his quotes countless times.  He never takes life or himself too seriously, and he reminds us that above all, art is beautiful.



Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Speaking of literary genius.  I read this book over the course of my senior year of college. Senior year wasn't the best of years.  It was full of fun and awesome things, but it was also full of endings.  This book was the constant.  It was something I could go to every night to ward off the thoughts that kept me down.  It was something that made me think deeply about life.



Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
It reminded me that princesses can be clever, and strong, and selfless.  There's so much more beyond a pretty face.  I've reread this so many times I can't even count.  It's better each and every time.  Every girl should read this before she goes to middle school.  And once every so often, just to remember.



The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
Do I need words?  He's been present in so much of my life. 



The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
I feel sad every time I finish these books, because I don't want them to end.  They're the purest, most whimsical, most breathtaking examples of childhood fantasy.  They remind me why I wanted to become a writer in the first place, and they make me feel like there's magic in the world even when it seems dark.



Grimm's Fairy Tales
My favorite bedtime stories, even though they were creepy.  Especially because they were creepy.



Arthur Goes to School by Marc Brown
By all memorable accounts, the first book I ever read completely on my own without ever having heard of before.



Be Nice to Spiders by Margaret Bloy Graham
And finally, the book that my family taught me to read on.  An underappreciated classic that taught me to read....but not how to be nice to spiders.






I could go on and on and on, but I'd be listing for so long.  Maybe I'll have to do another one of these again.  All I can say is...books are magical, and they've kept me going.

Click the book titles to find out more! 



What books are you thankful for? 


4 comments:

  1. Twilight, HP, Delirium, Die for Me, Throne of Glass and Graceling!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great choices! We have some common loves. (:

      Delete
  2. Oh wow loving this list! I am SO thankful for Harry Potter most of all. But also LotR, Narnia which you mentioned as well. I have a copy of The Count of Monte Cristo but I haven't read it yet. It is so huge, it's a little daunting. But I loved the film version and the book IS always better so I can't wait to read it :) Great post, thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I have to agree about HP. It's just unbeatable. You should read it! It IS daunting but so worth it, especially if you love that ornate old-timey style...which I do. Thanks for commenting!

      Delete