10.1.14

Book Blurb Breakdown: Love Letters to the Dead by Ava Dellaira

book blurb breakdown
                introduction

Book Blurb Breakdown is a Sarcasm & Lemons feature where your anal English degree-holding author rips apart (gently) jacket blurbs to pin down what makes her want to pick up the book instantly--and what makes her want to throw it at the wall.  See the original post for more detail.  



today's blurb

Status:  Unread


the blurb: as is 
from Goodreads

It begins as an assignment for English class: Write a letter to a dead person. Laurel chooses Kurt Cobain because her sister, May, loved him. And he died young, just like May did. Soon, Laurel has a notebook full of letters to people like Janis Joplin, Amy Winehouse, Amelia Earhart, Heath Ledger, and more; though she never gives a single one of them to her teacher. She writes about starting high school, navigating new friendships, falling in love for the first time, learning to live with her splintering family. And, finally, about the abuse she suffered while May was supposed to be looking out for her. Only then, once Laurel has written down the truth about what happened to herself, can she truly begin to accept what happened to May. And only when Laurel has begun to see her sister as the person she was; lovely and amazing and deeply flawed; can she begin to discover her own path.


the blurb:  shredded 

It begins as an assignment for English class: Write a letter to a dead person. (Okay, you've got me. Unique concept, could get into some deep stuff.  Also reminds me a little of the style in Perks of Being a Wallflower, which puts me in a good mood already.) Laurel chooses Kurt Cobain (LOVELOVELOVE it's really not fair to mention my idol because now I have to read) because her sister, May, loved him.  (Past tense.  That's intriguing already.)  And he died young, just like May did.  (Now we have a mystery.  I don't know how May died, so I want to read more to find out.) Soon, Laurel has a notebook full of letters to people like Janis Joplin, Amy Winehouse, Amelia Earhart, Heath Ledger, and more (Amelia Earhart is a weird choice.  The others have a theme.  Drug use, 27 club, risk takers.  Earhart breaks the mold in a way that's jarring and takes me out of the right mood); though she never gives a single one of them to her teacher. She writes about starting high school, navigating new friendships, falling in love for the first time, learning to live with her splintering family.  (This is no a throw-away sentence.  It gives a hint of the major plot points that will happen within this letter framework.  Plus, I like the "splintering family" bit.  Is it because of May?) And, finally, about the abuse she suffered while May was supposed to be looking out for her.  (Ooh, now I'm sold.  So Laurel was abused but May is the one dead.  That's unexpected.  This really makes me want to find out what was going on.  I also don't know where the abuse came from, when it happened.) Only then, once Laurel has written down the truth about what happened to herself, can she truly begin to accept what happened to May.  (This makes me think not suicide.  Important, because your blurb should always hint appropriately.) And only when Laurel has begun to see her sister as the person she was; --lovely and amazing and deeply flawed;--can she begin to discover her own path.  (Ugh, "discover" and "path" should be banned from blurbs anywhere, unless you're talking about actually discovering an actual path made of ground.  It's too vague.  I don't even know what that's supposed to mean.  What's her "own" path? Whose path was she on before?!)  



the verdict 
5/5 stars

The first sentence was pithy and compelling, and that tone carried through the blurb.  There's not a lot of extra detail.  You get a sense of the concept, a few hints about the plot, and, most importantly, some just-vague-enough hints about big mysteries.  I'm a little worried how the letters will fit into the plot.  I definitely want to actually read the letters, not just read about them.  Also, with the list of things that Laurel writes about (friends, first love, family) there's a danger for the plot to get aimless.  However, those worries aren't enough to bother me, because (despite the dumb last half of the last sentence) I have to know the answers to all the implicit questions.  

Except Letters to the Dead would have been a pithier title.  
Also the cover is gorgeous.  



your thoughts

Does this blurb grab you?  
Do you agree with my thoughts?  If not, how so?  
Do you have any recommendations for blurbs I should shred?  











2 comments:

  1. I want to read this book now, the blurb had goosebumps all over me. I do agree with your taking apart of this blurb, most things i thought myself as i read it, especially about the path to discover.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad to have introduced a good book too. ;) Thanks! That line irked me to no end.

      Delete

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