7.5.15

Book Blurb Breakdown: A School for Unusual Girls by Kathleen Baldwin

book blurb breakdown

Book Blurb Breakdown is a Sarcasm & Lemons feature where your anal English degree-holding author (gently) rips apart jacket blurbs to pin down what makes her want to pick up the book instantly--and what makes her want to throw it at the wall.  See the original post for more detail.  

Now, you too can shred a blurb and post for the world to see!  The post will go up at 12:01am on Thursdays.  Just link back with this fancy little button and add your name to the linky at the bottom.  You can share your grammar nitpicks or just your thoughts.  Make it your own! 

You can also choose to shred the same blurb, or pick your own!  






today's blurb



Status:  Unread


the blurb: as is 
from Goodreads


It’s 1814. Napoleon is exiled on Elba. Europe is in shambles. Britain is at war on four fronts. And Stranje House, a School for Unusual Girls, has become one of Regency England’s dark little secrets. The daughters of the beau monde who don't fit high society’s constrictive mold are banished to Stranje House to be reformed into marriageable young ladies. Or so their parents think. In truth, Headmistress Emma Stranje, the original unusual girl, has plans for the young ladies—plans that entangle the girls in the dangerous world of spies, diplomacy, and war.

After accidentally setting her father’s stables on fire while performing a scientific experiment, Miss Georgiana Fitzwilliam is sent to Stranje House. But Georgie has no intention of being turned into a simpering, pudding-headed, marriageable miss. She plans to escape as soon as possible—until she meets Lord Sebastian Wyatt. Thrust together in a desperate mission to invent a new invisible ink for the English war effort, Georgie and Sebastian must find a way to work together without losing their heads—or their hearts... 


the blurb:  shredded 


It’s 1814. Napoleon is exiled on Elba. Europe is in shambles. (Yay, historical!  I'm reminded of Dark Unwinding.) Britain is at war on four fronts. And Stranje House, a School for Unusual Girls, (Unusual?  Loving this.) has become one of Regency (Sort of unnecessary.) England’s dark little secrets. The daughters of the beau monde who don't fit high society’s constrictive mold are banished to Stranje House to be reformed into marriageable young ladies. (I'm intrigued so far.  Clearly there's a pro-feminist bent.  The tone so far, stuffy and clipped, is very Regency in the most delightful way.) Or so their parents think. (Do tell.) In truth, Headmistress Emma Stranje (Really?  Couldn't just write "Strange"?  Strangeman is a real name; Strange isn't far off.  I hate cutesy things, hate them.), the original unusual girl, (Original? Are they vampires?) has plans for the young ladies—plans that entangle the girls in the dangerous world of spies, diplomacy, and war. (I don't know why I don't like this sentence, but I don't.  I like the implication, however.  A school for misfits that's really a school for spies?  Very exciting.  This paragraph is also very succinct and clear.) 

After accidentally setting her father’s stables on fire while performing a scientific experiment, Miss Georgiana Fitzwilliam is sent to Stranje House. (The transition between set-up and Georgie is a bit abrupt.) But Georgie has no intention of being turned into a simpering, pudding-headed, marriageable miss. (I thought it actually wasn't a finishing school?  Shouldn't she love it there? So confused.) She plans to escape as soon as possible—until she meets Lord Sebastian Wyatt. (...and decides she'd like to become simpering and marriageable after all.) Thrust together in a desperate mission to invent a new invisible ink for the English war effort, (I'm intrigued again, even though this is a mess of a sentence.) Georgie and Sebastian must find a way to work together without losing their heads (Oh god, don't say it.)—or their hearts...  (You said it.)  


the verdict 
3/5 stars

would i read it?:  maybe, depends on reviews

This blurb starts out strongly.  It's first paragraph is a relatively succinct set-up.  You know it's historical.  You have a sense of the Britishy Victorian tone of the writing.  You also have a horrifically kitschy surname, but I'll allow it.  I was all for it until the second paragraph, when I lost touch with the story.  There's no good explanation why Georgie would want to escape the school, given that it's actually a spy school.  I was expecting "until she realizes it's a spy school" and got the same romantic set-up I see written in ten different ways every time I browse Goodreads.  The cliche ending wasn't a great touch, either.  Still, the language is appealing (pudding-headed, simpering, marriageable miss), which leads me to expect that the book itself might have equally amusing diction.  I'm torn.  


your thoughts

Does this blurb grab you?  
Do you agree with my thoughts?  If not, how so?  
Do you have any recommendations for blurbs I should shred?  






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