2.9.16

Book Blurb Breakdown: When the Moon Was Ours by Anne-Marie McLemore

book blurb breakdown


Book Blurb Breakdown is a Sarcasm & Lemons feature where your anal English degree-holding author (gently) rips apart jacket blurbs to pin down what makes her want to pick up the book instantly--and what makes her want to throw it at the wall.  See the original post for more detail.  

If you'd like to do a breakdown, here's a snazzy little button!  Post your link in the comments. 







today's blurb




Status:  Unread



the blurb: as is 

from Goodreads


When the Moon Was Ours follows two characters through a story that has multicultural elements and magical realism, but also has central LGBT themes—a transgender boy, the best friend he’s falling in love with, and both of them deciding how they want to define themselves.

To everyone who knows them, best friends Miel and Sam are as strange as they are inseparable. Roses grow out of Miel’s wrist, and rumors say that she spilled out of a water tower when she was five. Sam is known for the moons he paints and hangs in the trees, and for how little anyone knows about his life before he and his mother moved to town. 

But as odd as everyone considers Miel and Sam, even they stay away from the Bonner girls, four beautiful sisters rumored to be witches. Now they want the roses that grow from Miel’s skin, convinced that their scent can make anyone fall in love. And they’re willing to use every secret Miel has fought to protect to make sure she gives them up.


the blurb:  shredded 



When the Moon Was Ours follows two characters through a story (Kind of a weak word.) that has multicultural elements (I've always wondered, what's a multicultural 'element'?  Like, a theme?  Characters?  Huh?) and magical realism, but (Why is this a 'but?' More like 'and.') also has central LGBT themes—a transgender boy (Nice!), the best friend he’s falling in love with (So much teen angst. I'm down.), and both of them deciding how they want to define themselves. (I don't always like these opening expository bits before the actual blurb.  This one is okay, but I think the blurb speaks for itself--except that I agree it's important to highlight the trans MC.) 

To everyone who knows them, best friends Miel (Like "honey?") and Sam are as strange as they are inseparable. (I love this line. Sounds like my kind of guys.) Roses grow out of Miel’s wrist, (Okay, I'm intrigued. Like, personal wrist garden?) and rumors say that she spilled out of a water tower when she was five. (Magical realism can get a bit over-the-top, but I'm really looking forward to seeing how McLemore makes this work.  A water tower?  Like, the kind they paint smiley faces on???) Sam is known for the moons he paints and hangs in the trees, (Yeeeeees I love this so much!) and for how little anyone knows about his life before he and his mother moved to town. (Do you often know things about people's lives before they moved in? Maybe a small town?) 

But as odd as everyone considers Miel and Sam, even they stay away from the Bonner girls, four beautiful sisters rumored to be witches.  (This seems mundane in comparison. Lol.) Now (Not before?) they want the roses that grow from Miel’s skin, convinced that their scent can make anyone fall in love. (This last line feels weird. Like too much happened out of order.) And they’re willing to use every secret Miel has fought to protect to make sure she gives them up. (But where does Sam figure into this?  He sort of loses his starring role.)  


the verdict 

3.5/5 stars
would i read it?:  yes 


On one hand, I love the really pithy sentences and tight language, especially in the second paragraph.  I get a clear idea of who these characters are and what sets them apart.  On the other hand, that last paragraph feels loose and thrown together.  I feel like there is a sentence missing, something crucial to telling me how all these characters fit together.  Plus, it really puts the spotlight on Miel, while totally failing to explain how Sam fits into this story.  I mean, presumably he does stuff because he's Miel's bestie, but so far the main plot seems to concern only Miel and the Bonner girls.  However, it's Anne-Marie McLemore, so she gets credit where I might pull back a bit from another author.  It's a case of the content making up for a bit of hand-wavyness in the wording.  


your thoughts

Does this blurb grab you?  
Do you agree with my thoughts?  If not, how so?  
Have you read it?  Does the blurb match the pages? 
Do you have any recommendations for blurbs I should shred?  

 



2 comments:

  1. HAHAH I didn't even notice the name "Miel", now when I read this all I'll think about is honey.

    I almost never read book blurbs because I instantly forget them, but I would read this! I think would pulls me in the most is the whole wrist rose garden thing :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't it awesome? I love sneaky stuff like that.

      Yes, me too! It's so interesting!

      Delete

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